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A firm has y% manufacturing capacity - tricky DS

by Guest Sun Aug 03, 2008 3:39 pm

Can someone help me with the following question.

A firm has y% manufacturing capacity. It plans to increase its capacity by x%. Will it have enough capacity for next year?

1) y.(100-x) = 5040
2) y-x = 100
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Re: A firm has y% manufacturing capacity - tricky DS

by Guest Mon Aug 04, 2008 5:51 pm

Guest wrote:Can someone help me with the following question.

A firm has y% manufacturing capacity. It plans to increase its capacity by x%. Will it have enough capacity for next year?

1) y.(100-x) = 5040
2) y-x = 100



I would say the answer c
y-x=100, we can rewrite y=100+x, then Sub. into statement 1: (100+x)*(100-x)=5040, then to find out what's x. since x can not be negative, so use the positive x to find out what is y.
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by Guest Mon Aug 04, 2008 5:57 pm

I may think about this wrong. I was thinking that if the max capacity is 100%, i.e. y = 100%, then increasing it by any x% will not be possible because y is 100% and capacity can't go above that.
B says that the difference between the two is 100, so it implies that y% is always greater than 100% (we can consider that y% is 120%, and x% is 20% or y% is 130 and x is 30% so the difference is always 100).
If B says that y% is greater than 100%, no matter what x% is, there will not be enough capacity. So I picked B.

Am I thinking completely wrong on this?
RonPurewal
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by RonPurewal Wed Aug 13, 2008 3:51 am

Guest wrote:I may think about this wrong. I was thinking that if the max capacity is 100%, i.e. y = 100%, then increasing it by any x% will not be possible because y is 100% and capacity can't go above that.
B says that the difference between the two is 100, so it implies that y% is always greater than 100% (we can consider that y% is 120%, and x% is 20% or y% is 130 and x is 30% so the difference is always 100).
If B says that y% is greater than 100%, no matter what x% is, there will not be enough capacity. So I picked B.

Am I thinking completely wrong on this?


yeah, i'm with you here. the difference is that i'd restrict the interpretation to sensible percentages, meaning that i wouldn't allow ridiculous numbers such as 120% of capacity.
with the problem as written, this would mean that the sole sensible interpretation of statement 2 is
y = 100
x = 0
y can't be any greater (that's the meaning of "capacity"!), and x can't be less (unless you're allowing a decrease to be masked as a "negative increase", something i'm 100% positive that they wouldn't do).
so i guess that would be sufficient.

--

there's no way this problem, as written, can come from the gmatprep software. some of the official problems are weird, but the writing is always crystal clear - no ambiguity or vagueness, ever. so the original poster has either misattributed the source or butchered the original version of the problem.

what do you say, original poster?
MaheshK726
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Re: A firm has y% manufacturing capacity - tricky DS

by MaheshK726 Sat Jun 18, 2016 7:45 am


Can Some body post the original !
will be glad to know the answer! :lol:
RonPurewal
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Re: A firm has y% manufacturing capacity - tricky DS

by RonPurewal Thu Jun 23, 2016 6:14 pm

well, these posts are all 8-9 years old, so... it's very unlikely that the original poster will resurface. (:

the thread is now locked. (if someone finds the original source of this problem, then, a new thread should be made.)