Articles published in Logic Games

How to Pick the Best Diagram for a Logic Game on the LSAT

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Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - How to Pick the Best diagram for a Logic Game by Allison BellLearning science has come a long way in recent years, and we’ve been learning with it. We incorporate the latest discoveries in learning science into our LSAT course to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of your prep. Want to see? Try the first session of any of our upcoming courses for free.


Summer is here, and it is full of decisions. Will you do your logic games at the beach or poolside? Will you re-apply sunscreen or get through this LG section on time? The LSAT’s logic games section is similarly full of important decisions. One of the most important is how you will diagram each game. To guide me through that process, I use a sort of “decision tree.” Here are the steps. Read more

We Reviewed the June 2016 LSAT on Facebook Live. Here’s How it Went.

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Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - June 2016 LSAT Review - Published!Last week, Manhattan Prep instructors Matt Shinners (180 LSAT, Harvard Law JD) and Christine Defenbaugh (180 LSAT, Columbia Law JD) broke down the June 2016 LSAT (Prep Test 78) on July 7th, 2016 on Facebook Live. Read more

LSAT Logic Games: Hierarchy of Rule Notation

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Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - LSAT Logic Games: Hierarchy of Rule Notation by Christine DefenbaughLearning science has come a long way in recent years, and we’ve been learning with it. We incorporate the latest discoveries in learning science into our LSAT course to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of your prep. Want to see? Try the first session of any of our upcoming courses for free.


In order to efficiently crush logic games, we need to face the fact that we’re human. Mortal. Imperfect. We make mistakes, we forget things – even things we knew 15 seconds ago! We put our keys down and forget where a few hours later, we spend 20 minutes looking for the sunglasses that are sitting right on top of our heads. It’s an epidemic condition, this ‘humany-wumany’ fallibility.

So, since implanting cyborg supplements is not yet possible in LSAT preparation, we’ve got to come up with a series of safety nets that give us the best shot at fighting the ever-present human amnesia. Read more

Two Simple Rules for Approaching Rogue LSAT Logic Games

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Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - Two Simple Rules for Approaching Rogue Logic Games by Allison BellDid you know that you can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person LSAT courses absolutely free? We’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


It’s your LSAT test day. Things are going smoothly. You’ve dominated the first and second logic games. You flip confidently to the third one and begin reading. Your stomach turns. This doesn’t look familiar at all! You have no idea what diagram to use! Rule number three looks like you’ll need the Rosetta Stone to crack it. If someone could take a picture of your face right now, you better believe you’d be an internet meme in no time flat. Thank goodness no cell phones are allowed. Read more

#MovieFailMondays: Gone Girl (Or, How Movies Can Teach You About Logical Fallacies and Help You Ace the LSAT)

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Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - #MovieFailMondays - Gone GirlEach week, we analyze a movie that illustrates a logical fallacy you’ll find on the LSAT. Who said Netflix can’t help you study? 🎥📖


Did you know that you can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person LSAT courses absolutely free? We’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


I love a movie that delivers exactly what its title promises. And Gone Girl in fact features a woman who disappears. It’s also devilishly unclear, based on the title, exactly how that disappearance happened. A title that promises what the movie delivers without spoiling the twist? Gold. Read more

LSAT Scaffolding Part II: Logical Reasoning

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blog-scaffold-iiDid you know that you can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person LSAT courses absolutely free? We’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


Starting your LSAT prep can be a scary experience. You pick up a book and see all the complexity of the test at once. A long list of LR question types; many variations of logic games; Reading Comprehension, chapter after chapter! It’s a lot to take in, and most places that break the test down into categories like to impress with their long and exhaustive list.

 

This series of three blog posts—one for each section—will break down the LSAT at a much higher level. It’s important to start with a strong scaffold for the section.
Read more

Here’s Where to Start Your LSAT Prep

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blog-startlsatWhen you first begin preparing to take the LSAT, it certainly feels like there is a lot—too much—to take in. There are dozens of practice tests; dozens, if not hundreds, of websites; and dozens of strategy guides! Where do you begin?!?! Read more

LSAT Scaffolding Part I: Logic Games

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blog-scaffoldDid you know that you can attend the first session of any of our online or in-person LSAT courses absolutely free? We’re not kidding! Check out our upcoming courses here.


Starting your LSAT prep can be a scary experience. Sure, you’ve thought before in your life, often logically (though that’s probably less frequent than you’d think!). You’ve played some games before. And you’ve certainly read.

However, the LSAT is testing a slightly different version of each of these tasks than the one that you’re used to. Because, in our day to day lives, we’re actually quite illogical. Read more

#MovieFailMondays: Independence Day (or, How Movies Can Teach You About Logical Fallacies and Help You Ace the LSAT)

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blog-IDEach week, we analyze a movie that illustrates a logical fallacy you’ll find on the LSAT. Who said Netflix can’t help you study? 🎥📖

Readers, you’re in for a treat today. We’re going to examine an all-time classic, point out a huge flaw in the movie, and look at a deleted scene that functions as an answer to a completely different type of LSAT question! Read more

#MovieFailMondays: Ferris Bueller’s Day Off (or, How Movies Can Teach You About Logical Fallacies and Help You Ace the LSAT)

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blog-bueller

Each week, we analyze a movie that illustrates a logical fallacy you’ll find on the LSAT. Who said Netflix can’t help you study? 🎥📖

Life moves pretty fast. If you don’t stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it. Read more