Articles published in Study Tips

Important Questions to Ask Yourself on LSAT Logic Games (Part 1)

by

Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - Important Questions to Ask Yourself on LSAT Logic Games (Part 1) by Ben Rashkovich

Ready to study the right way? We incorporate the latest discoveries in learning science into our LSAT course to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of your prep. Want to see? Try the first session of any of our upcoming courses for free.


I’ve found that one of the best ways to elevate your strategy on LSAT Logic Games is to figure out which sorts of questions lead you to the best diagrams and the right answers. These are questions that should be knocking around in your head during every game, guiding your thought process and giving you direction. Read more

Timing: Not All LSAT Questions Are Created Equal

by

Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - Timing: Not All LSAT Questions Are Created Equal by Chris Gentry

Learning science has come a long way in recent years, and we’ve been learning with it. We incorporate the latest discoveries in learning science into our LSAT course to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of your prep. Want to see? Try the first session of any of our upcoming courses for free.


And so you want to answer every question, but you shouldn’t spend the same amount of time on every question. And ideally, you’d like to use the easy LSAT questions to buy time for the harder LSAT questions.

So what can we do in our practice to implement this? Read more

How to Get the Most Out of an LSAT Study Group (Part 1)

by

Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - How to Get the Most Out of Your LSAT Study Group (Part 1) by Matt Shinners

Ready to study the right way? We incorporate the latest discoveries in learning science into our LSAT course to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of your prep. Want to see? Try the first session of any of our upcoming courses for free.


Stacey Koprince, one of our amazing GMAT instructors, recently wrote an article about how to make the most of a study group for that exam. It sounded like a great idea, so I’m adapting it for LSAT study groups! Here’s a (lightly) edited version, tailored for all you future lawyers.

Stacey, all yours! Read more

Speed vs. Accuracy on the LSAT

by

Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - Speed vs. Accuracy on the LSAT by Daniel Fogel

Ready to study the right way? We incorporate the latest discoveries in learning science into our LSAT course to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of your prep. Want to see? Try the first session of any of our upcoming courses for free.


Most LSAT students who encounter time trouble attempt to speed up. This is a natural reaction, of course, but there’s an inherent tradeoff of accuracy when you increase your speed. You may finish the section, but that won’t translate to a higher score if rushing leads to mistakes. So how do you know the right balance of speed vs. accuracy on the LSAT? Read more

A Guide to Note-Taking on the LSAT

by

Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - A Guide to Note-Taking on the LSAT by Ally Bell

Ready to study the right way? We incorporate the latest discoveries in learning science into our LSAT course to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of your prep. Want to see? Try the first session of any of our upcoming courses for free.


If you, like me, prefer to take your LSAT studying poolside during these hot summer days, here’s an analogy that you’ll relate to: Note-taking on the LSAT is like applying sunscreen. Like sunscreen, if you use too many notes on certain parts of the LSAT, you may be left with foolish-looking marks that didn’t end up being especially useful; but use too little, and the test will scorch you just like the sun. Also like sunscreen, there’s a time and place for notes on the LSAT. Unless you’re hanging at a nudist pool, you probably don’t need sunscreen literally everywhere, nor do you need notes everywhere on the LSAT. Unfortunately, figuring out sunscreen is generally a lot simpler than figuring out note-taking on the LSAT. Since this is an issue many of my students grapple with in all phases of their preparation, here are a few guidelines, and here’s hoping you’re reading them by the pool. Read more

Drop the Phone and Pick Up Some Books!

by

Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - Drop the Phone and Pick Up Some Books! by Ben Rashkovich

Ready to study the right way? We incorporate the latest discoveries in learning science into our LSAT course to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of your prep. Want to see? Try the first session of any of our upcoming courses for free.


Last month, I wrote about how diving into Shakespeare can help you improve your LSAT Reading Comprehension score, by forcing you to “read for the scale.” (If you’re not sure what that means, check out the article!)

While the scale is important in every passage you’ll tackle—since the LSAT is, of course, a test about arguments—you shouldn’t neglect the fundamentals of Reading Comprehension as a general test section. It’s on just about every standardized test, from the SATs and ACTs to the LSATs and MCATs… And for good reason.   

So, LSAT-specific Reading Comprehension tips aside, how can you get better at the basics?

One answer: Read more books! Read more

LSAT Logic Games: Some Common(ly Overlooked) Deductions

by

Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - LSAT Logic Games: Some Common(ly Overlooked) Deductions by Chris Gentry

Learning science has come a long way in recent years, and we’ve been learning with it. We incorporate the latest discoveries in learning science into our LSAT course to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of your prep. Want to see? Try the first session of any of our upcoming courses for free.


Almost all test-takers seem to share two concerns about LSAT Logic Games: speed and speed. Oh, and people also seem to worry about speed for some reason.

Sound familiar? If so, you may want to read Daniel Fogel’s excellent post from a few months ago before you continue.

All done? Good! Read more

Love Is Blind… But Is Your LSAT Review Process?

by

Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - Love Is Blind... But Is Your LSAT Review Process? by Ben Rashkovich

Ready to study the right way? We incorporate the latest discoveries in learning science into our LSAT course to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of your prep. Want to see? Try the first session of any of our upcoming courses for free.


When I ask my students how they review the LSAT prep tests they take, they usually fall into what I call the “spell of the score”: they’re mostly interested in whether they hit their target score or not, and not so focused on how to maximize their LSAT review process.

This is a huge mistake. Read more

Reading for the LSAT…in Only 35 Minutes!

by

Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - Reading for the LSAT ...in Only 35 Minutes! by Daniel Fogel

Ready to study the right way? We incorporate the latest discoveries in learning science into our LSAT course to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of your prep. Want to see? Try the first session of any of our upcoming courses for free.


Reading for the LSAT

While Logical Reasoning and Logic Games offer new challenges for almost all LSAT students, Reading Comprehension provides a more familiar task. This is both a blessing and a curse: answering questions about a passage may feel more comfortable than identifying a flaw in an argument; however, this familiarity leads students to bring a set of presumptions to RC that doesn’t translate to success on the LSAT. This often manifests in not only reduced accuracy, but also reduced speed. Read more

Challenging Vocabulary on the LSAT

by

Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - Challenging Vocabulary on the LSAT by Allison Bell

Ready to study the right way? We incorporate the latest discoveries in learning science into our LSAT course to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of your prep. Want to see? Try the first session of any of our upcoming courses for free.


No matter who you are and what kind of spelling bees you’ve won, you’re likely to encounter some new, challenging vocabulary on the LSAT. The test encompasses such a broad range of topics, from the feeding habits of dung beetles to Greek philosophy, that you’re bound to encounter a passage where it feels like you’re reading a foreign language. As a result, students often ask me what type of vocabulary they should study to prepare for the LSAT. Read more