Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog

A Practice Logic Game – Pat the Party Planner

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We were saddened to realize that one of our Logic Challenges was looking suspiciously similar to a real LSAT game. While we try to make our games LSAT-like, we don’t like to have them feel like copies of real ones. So, we’ve replaced #25 with the following. Enjoy!

Pat the Planner is planning her perfect party. The party will go from 8 pm to midnight. During this time, 8 different musical bands—K, L, M, N, O, P, R, and Q—each of which has at least one member in one of the other bands, will perform, each for thirty minutes.

The following conditions apply

At least one person in band M is in both bands K and O.
At least one person in band R is in both bands N and L.
O performs before K but after M.
P performs before L but after N.
No musician can perform in consecutive time slots.

1. Which of the following could be the order of bands that perform, from first to last?

(A) M, N, O, P, Q, L, K, R
(B) M, N, O, P, L, R, K, Q
(C) N, M, P, K, R, O, L, Q
(D) Q, N, M, L, P, O, K, R
(E) K, N, P, R, O, M, L, Q

Read more

Do I Have Enough Time to Get Ready for the LSAT?

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Time keeps on slipping...

Welcome to the panic room! Let’s start with a deep breath.

Those asking this question fall into a few categories, which we can broadly group as follows:

A. Test-day anxiety Annie

B. Novice Nick

C. Half-prepared Henrietta

We’ll start with Annie. She freaked out during the last LSAT. She was scoring decently on her practice tests, but lost her cool on the first logic game on test day (or perhaps the first LR section, or second RC passage, etc.). She definitely does have enough time to get ready, and here’s what she needs to do: 1 or 2 full-length LSATs per week. Time those tests like the pros (here’s a proctor), do them in various settings, and use an experimental section! Annie needs to review that LSAT deeply. (Here are some tips on how to effectively review.)

Let’s move on to Nick. Nick just began. He recently realized that his dream of opening a great Korean barbecue food truck has already been done, and furthermore, he’s allergic to kimchi – so he’s off to law school.  Nick needs to start by taking a practice test. Then he should look at the GPA and LSAT calculator to see what his chances are. If he’s over 15 points below the minimum he’d need for the two “easiest” schools that interest him, he probably needs to shoot for the Feb LSAT and applying for 2012 to give himself more time to prepare. Sorry, Nick! But, depending on what score band he’s at, if he needs only 5-10 more points, that’s within reason IF he fully devotes himself to the process! This would mean he does not work (and, let’s face it, it sounds like he’s free). His schedule would look something like this: Read more

When will they release the F#@$%! October 2010 LSAT Scores?

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In New York there are several companies that you can pay to provide you someone who will wait in line for you. But even in this ridiculous city, there’s nobody you can pay to do the waiting for you if you’re hitting refresh on your LSAC account, itching for your October LSAT score to be released. If you’d like to take an educated guess at when that’ll happen, here’s a list of past LSAT score release dates. On average they arrive about 4.5 days before the officially-sanctioned release date. It seems like the LSAT and airlines have hit on the same idea: set your arrival time late so that you show up early.

While you’re waiting, sign up for our October 2010 LSAT Review Workshop where we’ll review that LSAT and serve tea and cookies (if tea and cookies could be served live online).

Hang in there! That score’s coming any minute…

Jury Duty and the LSAT Part 2

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Let’s continue our personal injury saga that we began last week. After yet another break of a few days, we came back to hear opening statements – more or less what you see in the movies – followed by a few days of witnesses. The first witness was not officially called the King of Slips, Trips and Falls, but in essence he was. This man had more credentials about slips and trips than you, and I’m sure of this, can imagine exist. He has written the code for various policies on construction, he has taught classes, he’s been on TV (specifically his receipt of a national award was televised on 52 stations – that was really too much information!), and he’s board certified by everyone, and he’s run said boards. The jury was thoroughly over-impressed to the point of annoyance.

Similarly, we heard from a very certified doctor who told us in no uncertain terms that the plaintiff broke his nose and that it really, really hurt. What amazed me is how much these guys get paid. $7,500 to appear in court for less than an hour! These specialists show up in court cases all the time and make a huge bundle of money. That’s when I started calculating. If the plaintiff has these two expert witnesses – about $15,000 – the lawyers must be hoping to win a huge payment. Thankfully, the plaintiff doesn’t pay a dime to the lawyer unless they win the case. If they do, the lawyers take a huge chunk of the settlement. Wow – they were hoping to win hundreds of thousands of dollars. And this was for a broken nose and a twisted pinky.

It turns out, we learned from meeting the plaintiff, that he went back to work two days later, then flew across the world to get married. Now, he is able to do everything he was able to do previously – basketball, painting rooms, etc. So, what were we actually going to be paying for? Read more

Jury Duty and the LSAT

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Yeah, jury duty!

It happens to the best of us, and even to me:  I was called for jury duty last week and I had already used my get-out-of-jury-duty-for-free passes. So, off I went to the New York County Courthouse to wait out my two days of not being called to a case (I’ve done this before). But it turns out I was actually selected! While almost everyone there complained, it was actually a fascinating experience, and, among other things, it reinforced for me why the LSAT is so predictive of one’s performance in law school: it actually tests many of the skills that lawyers use (though, it became clear, not all of them).

It all began with Voir Dire – and if you’re a true LSAT geek, you are thinking of that one RC passage about Voir Dire and exposure to the media. Voir Dire is a fancy way of saying jury selection. The lawyers asked us questions and flicked us off the jury depending on our answers, biases, etc. We were quickly informed that this would be a personal injury case. That immediately made me think of those commercials – like Saul in Breaking Bad. Or this commercial. We were asked whether we worked for the subway — ah, someone got hit by a subway?! – and whether we knew some guy. And have we been in a personal injury case before? Oh, your mother was? What part of her body was injured? Oh, her nose…

It started to become apparent – some guy broke his nose on the subway. Ouch. Read more

Should I Cancel My LSAT Score?

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It’s the Monday after an LSAT, so this is the question that’s filling the LSAT-universe. It’s not a pleasant discussion, but let’s get into it. Assuming that you just had a bad test day experience, here are a few considerations you should, well, consider:

1. Was this LSAT considerably different than your usual practice test experience? For example, did you only complete 3 games or RC passages when you usually complete 4? Or did you become violently ill?

2. Were you scoring comfortably within an acceptable score range on your last 2 – 3 practice tests?

3. What is the policy of the schools that interest you in terms of considering all scores, only your best, etc.

First things first:  if YOU KNOW you bombed the LSAT, then you should cancel (unless all your goal schools are firmly committed to only considering your best score).

Now that we have that out of the way, you should start with #3. Let’s say that you have 8 schools in mind. If 6 of them will look at all your scores, then that should steer you towards canceling and re-taking. Read more

A New Law School Admissions Resource (that’s free for the next 2 days)

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While I spend 90% of my day in front of a computer, I have not yet dived into the world of e-books. But, probably you have! Even if you’re like me and you love the feel of the pages, and the gentle wear of a book’s spine, you should check out Anna Ivey’s e-book – The Ivey Guide to Law School Admissions. Not only is there some juicy advice in there, but Anna just told me that this book is a free download for the next two days! It’s first come, first served – there is a limit to the kindness of publishers!  Use the code LAUNCH and hop to it!

Atlas LSAT is becoming Manhattan LSAT!

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On October 11th, Atlas LSAT will officially become Manhattan LSAT!

Why the change?

Several years ago, Manhattan GMAT created a sister company to tackle the LSAT. To ensure that this new company developed its own reputation and developed its own LSAT-specific program, it was decided to run this new company separately and give it a distinct name. Atlas is all grown up now and is ready to take its place alongside Manhattan GMAT. We’ve also launched Manhattan GRE , and with three related companies it makes sense for us to have a shared name so people know who we are.

What’s going to change:

•    Our name
•    Our logo
•    Our e-mails (studentservices@manhattanprep.com/lsat/, for example)
•    Our website address (though we’ll automatically re-direct you to our new site, so no worries if your fingers memorized “www.atlaslsat.com”)

What’s not going to change:

•    Our focus on great teaching.
•    Our LSAT-specific curriculum.
•    Our LSAT-specific audition and training program.
•    Your account login, your access to all of our awesome online resources.
•    Our telephone number: 646-254-6480

Thanks to everyone who has been a fan of our company and referred us to their friends – and we appreciate you switching over with us to the new name. It’ll be sad to lose the cool almost-anagram of Atlas LSAT, but we’re excited to officially join the Manhattan prep family.

– Noah Teitelbaum

Managing Director

Manhattan LSAT!

LSAC Predicts Which Law School You’ll Get Into

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The LSAT is many things, but cutting edge it is not. It knows the LSAT is pretty darn predictive, so there’s no apparent interest in switching from paper and pencil to a computerized format. And you still need to use a #2 pencil – and mechanical pencils are even a no-no! But, this past month we see that LSAT has finally upgraded their website. Congratulations, LSAC!

The features are more or less similar – a file moved here, a sample test gone there – but one thing that will interest folks who like to stay up late wondering what are the chances of getting into Columbia with a 3.5 and a 172….It was always on the LSAC website, but it was deeply buried and wasn’t so pretty. It used to feel like something dirty and forbidden! LSAC realized what we all want to do all day between practice tests!

Happy school hunting!

Should I Take the October LSAT?

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With just 3 days left to decide whether to take the October LSAT, some folks are pulling out their hair. So, for your flow-charting pleasure here’s a guide to making this decision…To be taken with a grain of salt, especially if the schools you care about take your higher LSAT score, no questions asked. If that’s the situation, the issue is mainly whether you have more attempts available.