Articles tagged "Telling Your Story"

Telling Your Story: Specificity Wins

by

Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - Telling Your Story: Specificity Wins by jdMission

A personal statement is really no more than telling a story—one that illuminates the “you” a law school would be lucky to have in its student body. In this series, “Telling Your Story,” a jdMission Senior Consultant will discuss how elements of storytelling can—and should—be applied to your personal statement.


When writing your personal statement, using specificity wherever you can is always good. For example, writing the following is fine: Read more

Telling Your Story: Include Emotional Thinking

by

Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - Telling Your Story: Include Emotional Thinking by jdMission

A personal statement is really no more than telling a story—one that illuminates the “you” a law school would be lucky to have in its student body. In this series, “Telling Your Story,” a jdMission Senior Consultant will discuss how elements of storytelling can—and should—be applied to your personal statement.


Remember in elementary school when you would return to school in the fall, and your teacher asked you to write about your summer break? Your essay would read something like this:

First we went to see my grandma. Then we swam. After that, we came home, and I had to help my dad clean out the garage. Then I… Read more

Telling Your Story: Rephrase Those Clichés

by

Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - Telling Your Story: Rephrase Those Cliches by jdMission

A personal statement is really no more than telling a story—one that illuminates the “you” a law school would be lucky to have in its student body. In this series, “Telling Your Story,” a jdMission Senior Consultant will discuss how elements of storytelling can—and should—be applied to your personal statement.


You have finished a draft of your personal statement. You have read it over, looking for ways to make it stronger, and you have rewritten it a few times. Is it true? Yes. Is it compelling? Yes. Is it concise? Yes. Does it have an ending? Yes. Are you happy with it? Pretty much. What is left that could be improved? Read more

Telling Your Story: Talk about Yourself on Your Personal Statement

by

Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - Telling Your Story: Talk about Yourself on Your Personal Statement by jdMission

A personal statement is really no more than telling a story—one that illuminates the “you” a law school would be lucky to have in its student body. In this series, “Telling Your Story,” a jdMission Senior Consultant will discuss how elements of storytelling can—and should—be applied to your personal statement.


Your personal statement is meant to be about you, not about how the world works. Of course, you may need to share some facts about the world around you and the people in your life to make your story clear and meaningful, but a good rule of thumb is that you should be writing much more about yourself than about anything else. Read more

Telling Your Law School Personal Statement Story: Slicing Through Writer’s Block

by

law-school-personal-statement-story-writers-block-jdmissionA personal statement is really no more than telling a story—one that illuminates the “you” a law school would be lucky to have in its student body. In this series, “Telling Your Story,” a jdMission Senior Consultant will discuss how elements of storytelling can—and should—be applied to your personal statement.


We all suffer from writer’s block sometimes, and it can be particularly brutal when the stakes are high…like when you are trying to get into law school. Read more

Telling Your Story: Beginnings Are Boring

by

Manhattan Prep LSAT Blog - Telling Your Story: Beginnings Are Boring by jdMission

A personal statement is really no more than telling a story—one that illuminates the “you” a law school would be lucky to have in its student body. In this series, “Telling Your Story,” a jdMission Senior Consultant will discuss how elements of storytelling can—and should—be applied to your law school personal statement.


You walk into a bookstore to browse, pick up a book with an interesting title and open it to the first page. It begins, “I was born on a sunny day in Indiana in 1955.” Do you keep reading? If you are like me, probably not. I know better than to overvalue book covers, but I do judge most books by their first lines.

A general principle of storytelling is that too much exposition or background before the action starts is a guaranteed way to lose readers. The same idea can make your law school personal statement stronger, hooking a reader from the beginning rather than the middle. (Let’s be honest, an admissions officer may not even make it to the middle, depending on the strength of your application.) Read more